Ramadan help

35 posts | Original | Recent
 
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31 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 6:36am
via iOS
Hey everyone I'm Muslim and in a couple of weeks I'm going to be fasting, it's more difficult to exercise then because you can't drink water...... Ok ok exercise is non existent during the month but I want to change that so any advice on things I can do baring in mind you can't drink water, and also what foods are filling but healthy to eat when I can eat.
15 Jun
why didn't u worjout before suhoor ?
15 Jun
workout **
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31 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 7:47am
via iOS
Yeah I can which I didn't really class as excercise but I suppose it's better than nothing 
14 Jun
In a 1 hour walking session you can burn up to 250+ calories.
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191 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 7:57am
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You could try some Yoga.
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31 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 7:59am
via iOS
Never tried yoga I'll look for some classes thanx
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191 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 8:03am
via iOS
There's some great w/o's on here. I like to put some soothing yoga music on. You could do 30-45 mins and see how u get on. 
Good luck! 
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31 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 8:11am
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Cool thanx I'm gunna try those today after I drop my son off at nursery see what I think 
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3 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 8:58am
via iOS
Heey nadia
I'm a muslim too :) 
I'm going to try to work out after breaking our fasting and after the first week i think that i'm going too work out during the day time too after my body has adappted al little bit. 
But not too heavy workouts! 

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31 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 10:15am
via iOS
Yeah sounds like u have a plan fasting time in the UK is really long this year so I'm hoping after a week or so I'll be able to get into the routine for some fitness in there
14 Jun
Hi Nadia. Last Ramadhan i tried to do some yoga at 6.00pm for about an hour and then rest a little before break fast at 7.30. Yoga is the best choice for you i think. Good luck and happy Ramadhan too. :)
14 Jun
Hahahaha i'm a close neighbour. I live in holland :) It is going to be a longg day
14 Jun
Yeah I'm trying not to think about the hours
14 Jun
Well don't worry your stomach is going to remind you
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31 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 10:38am
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Haha true
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32 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 1:21pm
via iOS
You can walk after or before the breakfast
Also you can do any easy yoga workout at this time
I wish you a fast and scrumptious breakfast acceptable
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31 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 2:48pm
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Yeah I plan to do a lot if walking 
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31 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 3:05pm
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Wow really? That's good to know I'll be doing lots a walking
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667 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 3:13pm
via iOS
Well this is what I'm doing for ramadaan in my attempt for weight loss. Get up for sehri have oatmeal and a some banana or cottage cheese ( slow digesting) so will keep me full for longer. I won't exercise when I'm fasting because dont want to burn myself out. I'll try to be active. Get up stretch and walk around. Iftar I'm having 3pieces of chicken breast with salad. A fruit ( apple -97% water) will keep me full. Walk around for 10 mins let food digest. Come back from taraweeh. I'm performing so that itself is burning calories lol. Back from taraweeh if I'm feeling hungry ill snack on some nuts or another fruit or protein bar. And drink lots of water. Walk for 15 mins. Bath sleep......
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31 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 3:17pm
via iOS
Yeah sounds good I'm really hoping to eat healthy through Ramadan I have young kids who I feel bad on if I don't buy some sweets so I'm gunna be really really good and not touch them in sh Allah
14 Jun
In Shaa Allah
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4 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 5:18pm
via Android

Asalammualaykum
I am a Muslim too. Its gonna be tough. I was thinking about it last week. I'm at a young age. Last year was my first time fasting. I only missed 2 days though. Now I'm 11. Let's hope we

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4 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 5:26pm
via Android

Do you live in Beaumont?
:-)

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31 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 5:34pm
via iOS
Alaimkum masala am well done for doing Ramadan at your young age the first year is tough in sure you'll do great this year  no I'm frm the UK
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28 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 7:22pm
via Android

Hey guys. I know this isn't about food, but i'm very interested in other religions, so if you don't mind, could you please explain ramdam(sorry if i spelt that wrong) and general islamic belief? Thanks.

14 Jun
Email me at hafezameer@gmail.com
14 Jun
Sorry to be akward, but as i'm only 16, i don't email very much, and only people i have met. Could you explain it here?
14 Jun
"The Arabic term islam literally means "surrender," or "submission." Islam's believers (known as "Muslims" from the active participle of "islam"), accept surrender to the will of Allah (the Arabic word for God). Allah is viewed as a unique God---creator, sustainer, and restorer of the world. The will of God, to which man is to submit, is made known through the Qur'an (the Koran), revealed to his messenger Muhammad. Muhammad, it is claimed was the last of the great prophets which included Adam, Noah, Moses, Jesus and some others. The basic belief of Islam is expressed in the shahadah, the Muslim...
14 Jun
Hey Peter Ramadan or ramathan it's when muslims fast for 29 / 30 days every year the starts from sun rise to sun set every day for the month the after the month we celebrate that day is called Eid were u have a family meal spend the day with family and friends like you would for Christmas. Now if u want to learn more about the whole religion I'm not a scholar and wouldn't like to say anything incase I'm wrong lol so there's lots of web sites you could check out
14 Jun
Thanks. That was very interesting. :-)
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51 Posts
Jun 14, 2013 8:20pm
via iOS
I've heard that for Ramadan you eat a big breakfast in the morning and fast until the next morning or night, but anyway, why don't you wake up a bit earlier and exercise and then eat breakfast and go to bed earlier so you don't get cravings and feel hungry at night?
14 Jun
We cant eat from sunrise until sunset So it's oke to eat in the evening. But exercising during day time will get harder because we are not alowed to eat or drink :)
14 Jun
Oh ok, well then workout between sunset and sunrise, when it's dark.
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69 Posts
Jun 15, 2013 5:19am
via iOS
Good luck to all of us fasting this year :) 
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3 Posts
Jun 15, 2013 6:32am
via Android

What is the reason why fasting is prescribed?.

Praise be to Allaah.  

Firstly we must note that one of the names of Allaah is al-Hakeem (the Most Wise). The word Hakeem is derived from the same root as hukm (ruling) and hikmah (wisdom). Allaah alone is the One Who issues rulings, and His rulings are the most wise and perfect. 

Secondly: 

Allaah does not prescribe any ruling but there is great wisdom behind it, which we may understand, or our minds may not be guided to understand it. We may know some of it but a great deal is hidden from us. 

Thirdly: 

Allaah has mentioned the reason and wisdom behind His enjoining of fasting upon us, as He says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“O you who believe! Observing As-Sawm (the fasting) is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you, that you may become Al-Muttaqoon (the pious)”

[al-Baqarah 2:183] 

Fasting is a means of attaining taqwa (piety, being conscious of Allaah), and taqwa means doing that which Allaah has enjoined and avoiding that which He has forbidden. 

Fasting is one of the greatest means of helping a person to fulfil the commands of Islam.

 The scholars (may Allaah have mercy on them) have mentioned some of the reasons why fasting is prescribed, all of which are characteristics of taqwa, but there is nothing wrong with quoting them here, to draw the attention of fasting people to them and make them keen to attain them. 

Among the reasons behind fasting are: 

1 – Fasting is a means that makes us appreciate and give thanks for pleasures. For fasting means giving up eating, drinking and intercourse, which are among the greatest pleasures. By giving them up for a short time, we begin to appreciate their value. Because the blessings of Allaah are not recognized, but when you abstain from them, you begin to recognize them, so this motivates you to be grateful for them.

 2 – Fasting is a means of giving up haraam things, because if a person can give up halaal things in order to please Allaah and for fear of His painful torment, then he will be more likely to refrain from haraam things. So fasting is a means of avoiding the things that Allaah has forbidden. 

3 – Fasting enables us to control our desires, because when a person is full his desires grow, but if he is hungry then his desire becomes weak. Hence the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “O young men! Whoever among you can afford to get married, let him do so, for it is more effective in lowering the gaze and protecting one’s chastity. Whoever cannot do that, let him fast, for it will be a shield for him.” 

4 – Fasting makes us feel compassion and empathy towards the poor, because when the fasting person tastes the pain of hunger for a while, he remembers those who are in this situation all the time, so he will hasten to do acts of kindness to them and show compassion towards them. So fasting is a means of feeling empathy with the poor.

 5 – Fasting humiliates and weakens the Shaytaan; it weakens the effects of his whispers (waswaas) on a person and reduces his sins. That is because the Shaytaan “flows through the son of Adam like blood” as the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said, but fasting narrows the passages through which the Shaytaan flows, so his influence grows less. 

Shaykh al-Islam said in Majmoo’ al-Fataawa, 25/246 

Undoubtedly blood is created from food and drink, so when a person eats and drinks, the passages through which the devils flow – which is the blood – become wide. But if a person fasts, the passages through which the devils flow become narrow, so hearts are motivated to do good deeds, and to give up evil deeds. 

6 – The fasting person is training himself to remember that Allaah is always watching, so he gives up the things that he desires even though he is able to take them, because he knows that Allaah can see him. 

7 – Fasting means developing an attitude of asceticism towards this world and its desires, and seeking that which is with Allaah. 

8 – It makes the Muslim get used to doing a great deal of acts of worship, because the fasting person usually does more acts of worship and gets used to that.  

These are some of the reasons why fasting is enjoined. We ask Allaah to help us to achieve them and to worship Him properly. 

And Allaah knows best. 

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3 Posts
Jun 15, 2013 6:37am
via Android

What are the most important rights that are respected in Islam?

Praise be to Allaah.

Islamic rights are many, among the most important of which are the following: 

The rights of Allaah 

The blessings of Allaah to His slaves are innumerable. Every blessing deserves thanks. The rights of Allaah upon His slaves are many, the most important of which include the following: 

1.     Tawheed, which means believing that Allaah is One in His Essence, His names, His attributes and His deeds. So we should believe that Allaah alone is the Lord, the Sovereign, the Controller, the Creator, the Provider, in Whose hand is Dominion and He is Able to do all things:

“Blessed be He in Whose Hand is the dominion; and He is Able to do all things”[al-Mulk 67:1 – interpretation of the meaning]

2.     ‘Ibaadah (worship), which means worshipping Allaah alone because He is their Lord, Creator and Provider. So all kinds of worship should be devoted to Him alone, such as du’aa’ (supplication), dhikr (remembering Allaah), seeking help, humbling oneself, submitting, hope and fear, vows, sacrifices, and so on. Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“Worship Allaah and join none with Him (in worship)”

[al-Nisaa’ 4:36]

3.     Shukr (gratitude, giving thanks), for Allaah is the One Who bestows favours and blessings upon all of creation, so they have to show their gratitude for these blessings on their lips and in their hearts and in their physical actions, by praising Allaah and using these blessings to obey Allaah and in ways that Allaah has permitted:

“Therefore remember Me (by praying, glorifying). I will remember you, and be grateful to Me (for My countless Favours on you) and never be ungrateful to Me

[al-Baqarah 2:152 – interpretation of the meaning] 

The rights of the Messenger 

The sending of the Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) is a great blessing for all of mankind. Allah sent him to bring mankind forth from darkness into light, and to show them that which will bring them happiness in this world and in the Hereafter. 

Among the rights that the Messenger has over us are that we should love him, obey him and send blessings upon him. Loving him (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) is achieved by obeying his commands and believing what he told us, avoiding that which he forbade and not worshipping Allaah except in the ways that he prescribed. 

Parent’s rights 

Islam pays special attention to the family and encourages love and respect within it. The parents are the basis and foundation of the family, hence honouring one's parents is one of the best deeds and one of the most beloved actions to Allaah. 

Honouring one’s parents is achieved by obeying them, respecting them, being humble towards them, treating them kindly, spending on them, praying for them, upholding ties of kinship with those to whom one is related through them, and honouring their friends: 

“And your Lord has decreed that you worship none but Him. And that you be dutiful to your parents”[al-Israa’ 17:23] 

The rights of the mother in this regard are greater, because she is the one who bears the child, gives birth to him and breastfeeds him. A man came to the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and said, “O Messenger of Allaah, who is most deserving of my good companionship?” He said, “Your mother.” He said, “Then who?” He said, “Your mother.” He said, “Then who?” He said, “Your mother.” He said, “Then who?” He said, “Your father.”

(Agreed upon. This version was narrated by al-Bukhaari, al-Adab, 78) 

The rights of one Muslim over another 

The believers are brothers and are an integrated nation, like a building parts of which support other parts. They treat one another with mercy and compassion, and love one another. In order to preserve this building and this brotherhood, Allaah has prescribed rights which each Muslim has over his fellow Muslim. These include love, sincerity (naseehah), relieving his distress, concealing his mistakes, supporting him when he is in the right, respecting neighbours and honouring guests. 

These rights also include returning greetings of salaam, visiting the sick, accepting invitations, saying “yarhamuk Allaah (may Allaah have mercy on you) to a Muslim when he sneezes, and attending his funeral. The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: “The rights of one Muslim over another are five: returning the greeting of salaam, saying ‘yarhamuk Allaah (may Allaah have mercy on you)’ when he sneezes, accepting invitations, visiting the sick and attending funerals.” (Narrated by Muslim, 2625)

 Neighbour’s rights 

Islam pays attention to the issue of neighbours, whether they are Muslim or not, because of the interests served by that in making the nation like one body. The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said: ‘Jibreel kept on enjoining the good treatment of neighbours to the extent that I thought that he would include neighbours as heirs.” (Agreed upon. Narrated by Muslim, 2625) 

Among the rights of one neighbour over another as affirmed by Islam are the initiation of greetings, visiting him if he is sick, offering condolences if calamity befalls him, congratulating him at times of joy, overlooking his mistakes, concealing his faults, bearing his annoyance with patience, giving him gifts, lending him money if he needs it, lowering one’s gaze from looking at his womenfolk, and guiding him to that which will benefit him in his religious and worldly affairs. The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) said:

“The best of companions with Allaah is the one who is best to his companion, and the best of neighbours with Him is the one who is best to his neighbour.”(Narrated by al-Bukhaari in al-Adab al-Mufrad, 115) 

Concerning neighbours’ rights, Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning): 

“Worship Allaah and join none with Him (in worship); and do good to parents, kinsfolk, orphans, Al-Masaakeen (the poor), the neighbour who is near of kin, the neighbour who is a stranger, the companion by your side…”[al-Nisaa’ 4:36] 

Islam warns against annoying one’s neighbours or treating them badly. The Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) explained that this would lead to being deprived of Paradise: “He will not enter Paradise from whose harm his neighbour is not safe.” (Agreed upon. Narrated by Muslim, 64). 

In order to achieve the common interest, Islam gives rights to the ruler over his subjects and to the subjects over their ruler, and its gives the husband rights over his wife and the wife rights over her husband, and there are other just rights which Islam has enjoined. 

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112 Posts
Jun 15, 2013 9:41am
via Android

Salaam sister I'm a muslim living in Indonesia and have been quite active these last 6 months. But for this Ramadhan, I plan to do only 20-45 minutes casual workouts for 4-5 times in a week, just to keep my self fit and in shape. Probably by walking and doing light yoga, or just some stretches if I dont have enough time/energy. I'll stop running for a month hehehe..

Not sure I'm gonna have enough time to workout during nights, gotta spare time for night prayers and rest..  that's what Ramadhan is all about, right? So I'm thinking the best time to workout for me is early in the morning (after sahoor) or 1 hour before ifthar. I hope this can be an idea and you can suit that to your own need and schedule.

Hope you stay healthy and blessed during the holy month! :-)

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1 Post
Jun 15, 2013 10:31am
via Android

Hi Nadia ! I'm muslim too. Try to workout just before breaking the fasting bye 15 or 30 min (if u can ) .

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31 Posts
Jun 15, 2013 10:32am
via iOS
Salaam yes I hope we all stay healthy during Ramadan thnx for the advice 

 

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