Does lifting stunt your growth?

9 posts | Original | Recent
 
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29 Posts
Jul 28, 2013 6:26pm
via Android

Im 14, 170cm, 5'9, 55kg, I'm a bit worried, I don't lift too heavy

28 Jul
Ive always heard that it does. I thank its more 10-12 year olds but it cant be good for a 14 year old to lift heavy.
29 Jul
Yeah, I don't go too heavy.
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24 Posts
Jul 28, 2013 9:16pm
via Android

No it will not stunt your  growth if you do it correctly. Only things  That do stunt growth are steroids, some supplements(not protein supplements), bad diet and injuries(avoid injuries by using perfect form on all of your lifts, if you can't use good form you are lifting too heavy .

29 Jul
Thanks bud
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23 Posts
Jul 28, 2013 10:24pm
via Android

Lifting doesnt stunt your growth unless if u are lifting too heavy in fact u can grow taller by lifting weights because ur releasing Growth hormone which is a good thing n some athletes have been lifting weights from a young age ex. (Arnold schwarzennegger 6ft, shaquille o neal 7ft) n they arent even close to being short lol the only thing that stops u  from growing is bad nutrition, lack of sleep n no exercise

29 Jul
Thanks for the answer :D
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56 Posts
Jul 28, 2013 11:20pm
via iOS
The research that suggested it did was conducted on children who were carrying uneven loads in third world countries. Growth deformities were incorrectly assumed to be occurring in the wrong direction; shorter bones on one side of the body were a result of the load always being carried in the other side, thus it was later surmised that loading stimulated growth. This is accurate, but excessively heavy loads during a young age present other risks to do with longevity of training (how long into life you can train). 

The same goes for children, it is fine biologically for bones, ligaments and tendons but structure and strength aren't everything. 

Children need time to be "kids" as do teenagers. There are lots of benefits of regular exercise, but to allow it to become the only thing you do as a child or teenager will have negative effects.

Don't focus too much on low rep sets, go more for Hypertrophy work (muscle growth) 8-12 reps per set and 3-6 sets. 

I also note from your profile pic that you looked really ripped. This is an even bigger risk for a young male or female than the weights question. You need enough food to allow growth, if you don't get it then you will end up with weakened bones, tendons, ligaments and nervous system (including reduced brain function).

Don't be too concerned with looking ripped... Make sure  you eat enough. 

:)
29 Jul
Thanks a ton
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29 Posts
Jul 29, 2013 12:44am
via Android

How Heavy, is Heavy?  So heavy that I cant do more than 2 reps?

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41 Posts
Jul 29, 2013 3:30am
via iOS
Check out 6packshortcuts with mike Chang...alot of good tips and workouts...have fun B)
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667 Posts
Jul 29, 2013 6:07am
via iOS
WEIGHT TRAINING WILL NOT STUN YOUR GROWTH!!!! It's actually has many benefits.. What will stun your growth is steroids, some supplements and malnutrition. The thing with powerlifting at a young age will cause a curve in your lower back region. This curve in your spine will be cause because of the pressure from lifting heavy overhead. Or even having heavy upper body. Something that's curved will look shorter than it is.. If you know what I'm saying.. So powerlifting will make you look shorter. Leave that to when you're bone structure is developed well. Around 20+ ..
29 Jul
Thank you
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24 Posts
Jul 29, 2013 6:34am
via Android

6 reps should be your minimum.

29 Jul
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56 Posts
Jul 29, 2013 1:39pm
via iOS
The six rep as minimum advice is good, there are no absolutes in any research, and the research is still minimal and based in personal stories etc.

So whilst the smart money is on weight training being good for young people physiologically, there are other considerations such as adolescent wellbeing etc. 

I know that's not cool to talk about things other than pure growth, being huge and so on, but wholistic wellbeing is the biggest factor in long term training success.

Also, extremes in training will almost certainly have negative effects. Things such as super heavy weights at 1-3 reps max and super huge endurance at many hours.  

Moderation is the key.
29 Jul
Ah makes sense, thanks
29 Jul
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