Weight training

7 posts | Original | Recent
 
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18 Posts
Mar 12, 2015 3:30am
via Android

I had a question about the pound weights you use when weight training. Is it better to lift heavier weights. Will you lose weight quicker if you do or should you just stick to what your comfortable at. Can you still get good results like that? I always use 7.5-8 pond weights for arms and 10 pound weights for legs. . Should I push myself to using heavier weights or is it uneccessary?

12 Mar
For losing weight, you should use lighter weights with more repetitions of the work out. Heavier weight is for people looking to build mass and muscle. They'll usually target 4-5 reps of the weight and leaves them worn out. That's the overview. I don't the specifics of it. But lighter weight is usually for endurance and cardio
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821 Posts
Mar 12, 2015 5:47am
via Android

Tou will lose weight quicker by eating clean and going on a caloric defecit.  But to answer your question yes you should lift heavier weights when something becomes easier.dont worry you won't turn into the hulk. But to accelerate fat loss you should challenge yourself, lift those weights until the little voice in your head tells you to stop and say screw you and do 1 more rep. I like lifting heavy one week and light the next week. I find better results like that. And train til fail if you must.

Grayshirtface_thumb
96 Posts
Mar 12, 2015 2:54pm

I agree with Jovon. Heavy is the way to go. If you're doing isolation lifts then set your weight so you struggle to complete 5-8 reps. If you're doing complex lifts then set your weight so you struggle to complete 3-5 reps. As for cycling the weight every other week, I've never tried that but it sounds interesting, keeps your body guessing. Don't be afraid to pick up those HUGE dumbbells. Pay close attention to your form (see YouTube) and you'll be good to go.

Good luck!

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1655 Posts
Mar 12, 2015 5:48pm

I'll add to what the guys have said so far in that I like to lift weights in "cycles" after trying out a range of training programs over the last couple of years. What this basically means is that you change the weight/reps each week or month or whatever suits you. For example, 3 reps/max weight or 25 reps/low weight. I've moved to this method as I used to lift heavy all the time and although it lead to good results I was fatiguing my body and losing flexibility/functional muscle movement.

I'm a big believer that you need to keep your body guessing to keep pushing what your body is capable of doing but no matter what rep range I am doing I make sure I hit absolute fatigue... Far too many times I see people lifting a weight they can comfortably do, finish their reps and move on. What the hell is the point in that?!?

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95 Posts
Mar 13, 2015 3:43am
via iOS
Lift heavy
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18 Posts
Mar 16, 2015 12:33am
via Android

Thanks for you guys input. That definitely  helped because I'm new to doing weights . I'm definitely  gonna push myself now. It also sounds like a food idea to switch it up at times

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95 Posts
Mar 16, 2015 2:40am
via iOS
Let me put it this way: the more muscle you have, the more calories you burn.  Therefore, if you build more muscle, you will more efficiently burn calories each time you workout.  You're not going to get all masculin and muscle-y overnight, so don't worry about that!  Body builders spend months or years getting their physiques, I'm sure you'll notice unwanted gains at some point, and if you ever get to that point, slow down then.  For now, lit heavy!
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