How many years will it take?

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20 Posts
Jan 11, 2016 8:56am
via Android

I plan to lose fat and gain muscle. Considering height to weight, i need to cut my weight by 30 kgs. By cutting my weight, i mean cutting fat. I know that calculating the time required to transform the body will vary from person to person and depends on their lifestyle, but just give me rough idea of how long it might take so that i do not get demotivated if i do not see instant results lol.

Here is the scenario:
-A college student lifestyle
-workout 5-6 days a week for 1 hour each day atleast
-diet control (but not very strict diet)
-30 mins yoga in the morning everyday

Target: To lose 30 kgs weight. Then, move to bodybuilding and have good body (no abs, just flat tummy with good arms, shoulders, chest and legs)

My estimate: 1 year to lose weight and additional 4 years to reach goal.

Now, I need your views please.

P.S.- Sorry for a long post

11 Jan
First you need to control your diet. Eat healthy frequently in small quantities. Dinner should be light and at least 2 hours before sleep. Drink lot of water. In the beginning focus more in cardio to loose weight. Once you reach your weight goal, start lifting heavy weights. I hope this helps:-)
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20 Posts
Jan 13, 2016 5:28am
via Android

I would suggest just focusing on keeping on track and balance. When you incorporate exercise daily into your lifestyle consistently you will see changes. Nutrition is key to achieving fat loss. A resistance program with cardio typically burns the most calories. Muscle burns fat , build the muscle and stay active and fat burns away. It takes time , set small goals . Reach those goals every month . The muscle builds while fat is lost. Without knowing stats, or your health status as determined by a Dr. one should not guess about the time it would take. For a healthy young man of average fat percentage , 14% it should take no more than 6 months to a year if on a strict monitored program to lose the fat. Bodybuilding takes time,  for a younger guy in good health training hard, figure max muscle gain about 5lbs to 10lb a year of lean gain (10 top gainers). Keep in mind when you are lean , muscle looks bigger. Check out how much natural bodybuilders weigh, you may be shocked to find how light they are when they compete . Also, bodybuilders do not stay in competition shape year round . Some body fat is good. The key is to stay healthy as your health is very valuable. All the best with your fitness journey.

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45 Posts
Jan 13, 2016 3:33pm

I would just caution - slow and steady wins the race. It sounds like you're already doing a lot of the right things. You could make your diet stricter, but remember that if you want to keep the weight off, and not fall back again, your diet and lifestyle changes need to be ones that you can live with long-term. If you're feeling deprived and unhappy because you never get to have the things you love, it will be a lot harder to keep going and avoid temptation. If you have the opportunity, consider taking some healthy cooking classes, or seeing a nutritionist who can help you plot out a meal plan that will meet your goals, and also leave you feeling satisfied and like food is still something to enjoy, not a chore or an enemy. 

Same with working out - go hard core if it feels good! But again, go for sustainable, enjoyable, and effective.

Beware of fad diets and supplements. Not all supplements are created equal, and again, think about what you can sustain long-term. I'm not saying they're bad, just that you should do some research before choosing one (if you decide to use it), and use it to supplement, not replace, real food. You're rebuilding the habits of a lifetime, so think long-term!

Honestly your initial estimate of about a year sounds pretty fair to me. You could maybe shave off a bit; if you stay on course it could well be more like 7-8 mos. Google tells me 30kg=approximately 66 lbs. I'm not an expert, but I've always been told that healthy, sustainable weight loss should average to 1.5-2.5 lbs per week (depending on your individual body factors, of course). Say you lose 2lbs/wk, that's 33 weeks. Add some time for the weeks when you need to rest, or your family or home circumstances prevent you from doing your workout or sticking to your diet, etc. There will be weeks you lose more, and weeks when you might gain back one or two, no big deal. You could do it faster with a more hardcore program, but it's up to you to decide what you're ready for and what you can be happy with.

Just my two cents! As always, I'm open to correction by those who have more experience than I. This is just based on what I've read and my own experience. :)

 

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12 Posts
Jan 15, 2016 6:33am
via Android

Years? Not at all. 36kg=79.2lbs. If you plan to lose 13.2lbs/6kg/month in six months you'll be at your goal weight. Not following a strict diet and being a student (only if you're on campus using the dining facilities or opting for fast food), that's probably your best option. It can be done faster with dietary adjustments and a strict workout routine. ÷ your kg by # of months to see what you need to lose in a month to achieve your goal by a set date, ie, six months from now or whenever you decide.

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