Properly training to failure.

8 posts | Original | Recent
 
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459 Posts
Jul 6, 2015 11:57pm
via Android

There's been much debate about using the technique of "failure training". some say it's a good thing, some say it's a horrible thing, some have no idea wtf training to failure actually is.
This became apparent to me when I mentioned using such methods to a friend of mine and his perception was lifting to failure was simply lifting until you absolutely could not lift any more past the mid point.

This is incorrect.

First, what is training to failure? *Failure is reached whenever you no longer can perform a rep with STRICT form.

For example; if you're on bench press and you've managed to push 6 Reps at 205, with perfect form. Smooth and graceful, elbows pointed downward, bar over your nipple-line, shoulders pressed to the bench, Not locking out at the top...yet on that last rep you notice your elbows flaring and locking at the top for a bit of "rest"? You've reached failure. Pushing anywhere past this point will not only rupture your CNS causing a decrease in performance on subsequent sets, but also will cause small tears in your muscle tissue, increasing your chance of injury.

So then, when should you train to failure?

Failure training is certainly not a method you want to go for everytime you step into the gym. It has its benefits, in my opinion, same as most other techniques. I'd suggest using this method during high carb, muscle building days (hypotrophic days).

Being smart about your training methods and using those that have been proven effective is a good way to increase muscle and strength gains. There are many different methods that can be used in combination with one another or alone during your routines. Hope this helps.

Stay hungry. Stay humble. Remain the hardest working motherf*#$er out there.

#beastmodecamp #CampLife #NoMatterWhat #beastofwisdom

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7 Posts
Jul 7, 2015 12:29am
via Android

So very true DJ, some excellent points here especially keeping strict form, that is always the primary objective - never sacrifice form. I've recently focused on concentric movements, especially with bicep curls and am lovin it, reach that point where you think there's nothing left in the tank, rest briefly, then squeeze out a few more controlled reps, focus on the negative, albeit forgotten movement  - great post my friend

07 Jul
Thank you Lt. We're all getting older and have to start being a lot smarter with our training methods. A lot of young guys and girls don't understand this until it's too late.
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166 Posts
Jul 7, 2015 2:06am
via Android

Great post!  I'm positive that you prevented some injuries with this info. 

07 Jul
Haha, I hope so man
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821 Posts
Jul 7, 2015 4:07am
via Android

Ughh, already down the chain of sh**

I'll contribute something useful here, instead of my usual satire.

If your goal is fat loss. Training til failure may not be the smartest decision. You see when you train until failure,  you are going to feel it. Maybe sore for up to a week. And if you being sore will conflict with say a planned hiit session, your goals for fat loss will be limited. 

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459 Posts
Jul 7, 2015 4:19am
via Android

Good point Jovon.
It should be reiterated that this method; failure training, is for those whom are trying to Build Muscle and are on a calorie increase.

Your body will not be able to compensate for the amount of lactic acid build up from this method that causes protein synthesis. Basically you will LOSE muscle as they will practically eat themselves to repair. Which is why you need the extra and proper macro nutrients.

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459 Posts
Jul 7, 2015 3:06pm
via Android

...aaannnd back to the top

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459 Posts
Aug 27, 2015 1:57pm
via Android

Bumping (and grinding)

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214 Posts
Aug 27, 2015 3:14pm

What are your thoughts guys on whether to use heavy or light weights when training to failure?

27 Aug
Do both. It just happens faster when using heavy weight. And actually can come down to goal specific training.
27 Aug
I do both*
27 Aug
You mean you simply get to failure faster using heavy weights? I dunno, Jovon... I feel like maybe lighter weight and a few more reps could actually be a better idea but everyone are freaking out about the heaviest sh!t :\
27 Aug
Yes you get to failure faster using heavier weights. But if you go light, and say do 25 Reps to fail that is also challenging your cardiovascular system. But there are different training methods to acheieve different things. I personally use both. I hope I'm making sense right now as I'm pretty beat
27 Aug
I see, thanks for your replay! Go have some well deserved rest :)
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