Heavy weights for women

5 posts | Original | Recent
 
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16 Posts
Jan 19, 2015 3:26pm
via Android

So I've been doing some reading about the benefit of strength training with heavy weight. That the "low weight many reps" thing for women is a myth. Anyone out there strength train with lots of weight? What are your thoughts?

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1 Post
Jan 19, 2015 3:35pm
via iOS
Okay so what I have discovered is that using light weight will only get you so far. I lift pretyy heavy, (I weigh 127 and squat 155, bench 135) and holy moly the results are amazing. Despite the rumors, you will not get "huge" if you lift heavy. It will make you for, toned, and sexy. Sure some people will try and put you down and say "okay but don't get too big" or "women shouldn't lift heavy" or "women shouldn't have muscles". Well I've called BS on that and screw patriarchy, because I'm the fittest I've ever been and dang does my body look good! So yes ladies: lift heavy, it's the best thing you'll ever do! 
19 Jan
Dang! Thank you.
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5 Posts
Jan 19, 2015 3:40pm
via Android

Hey Casey,

I just got this app yesterday but have years of experience as a Personal Trainer in many departments. One thing to remember is that your body is constantly adapting to every environment and workout you put it through. That being said, it will adapt to heavy, moderate and light weights. For your question, No, it is not a myth, you will just fire up more momentary metabolism is about it. For reps, 4-8 at 8 -10 sets builds bulk and strength, 8 - 12 at 3-6 sets builds, muscle, strength and tone, 12 - 16 at 4 sets builds endurance and tones what is already there. The reason the reps go from 4-8, 8-12, 12-16 is if you hit the higher end of each category, then the weight is too light,  remember it adapts so for example, if you are doing 12-16 for tone and you do 16 reps, bump up the weight and see if your max reps is 12 or 14. Once you came hit 16 with ease, bump up the weight, that keeps you muscles adapting the right way!! Good luck!

19 Jan
Great. Thanks for the advice! If I'm training to run, should I work towards endurance? I feel like I should be in the middle category with the strength training, though.
19 Jan
Definitely do moderate, it builds explosiveness if you do the rep solid and quickly through the muscle contraction. Athletes use this method to train for sports, it helps runners alot. Good luck, let me know if I can help you anymore!
19 Jan
Light builds endurance for the specific muscles group through the range you put it through. Example is squats with light weight, builds quad endurance through squat motion. It mostly just tones, it won't help as much with running, other than cardiovascular endurance, but if you're running a little everyday, that's covered so you can focus on muscle build and explosive output!!
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29 Posts
Jan 19, 2015 5:08pm
via Android

Take a look at my pics. I use what I consider to be light weights now. Let me explain something... this is actually coming up in one of my weekly lessons if you'd like to follow that topic of mine but I'll share an insight early for yas... muscles don't know weight, they only know tension. Why train with heavy weights and risk injury when you can create the tension of 60lb dumbbells with 20 lbs using certain techniques? Sounds like BS? Hit me up and find out.

19 Jan
You, sir, are the first one that I have seen to bring that up here and I applaud you. People always want to bump up the weight at the risk of form when exercises get too easy. The body is designed to adapt to a stimulus after being subjected to it for an amount of time. Adding weight is not always the best solution. I love to take one month to drop the weight, use higher reps, and use different exercises. It's all about providing enough stimulus for your body to adapt, then change it up again. You da man
20 Jan
So...it sounds like if I've been doing more reps, then I could bump the weight up for a month and then dip it back and change up my routine the following month... would that be a good plan?
20 Jan
Casey the idea is to, through whatever way possible, mechanically or and I'll explain on this more "intentionally" put stress on the targeted muscle. Mechanically: let's say for instance you do a set and it's easy, well you do the same set but slow down the rep speed on the eccentric and really focus on squeezing the muscle at concentric part. So this increases time under tension and you get tired at the same pace but you've done less reps. Then to advance on that you could do a superset with another exercise. Intentions: (please try this and give me...
20 Jan
Exactly. Resistance training is so much more than moving a specified account from point a to b. Switch up the tempo and really focus on the muscles that are being trained on each exercise. That's the first thing I tell clients. Learn what muscles contract and expand for each exercise and visualize them working for each rep. Step one is conditioning your body to recruit the correct muscles for the right range of motion
20 Jan
Spot on, and if you can't get the most from your muscles at a lighter weight using full range of motion and proper contractions then you're going to get even less from a heavier one. If you can't consciously contract a target muscle without picking up a weight then don't pick one up, learn these techniques that Jason and I talk about and you'll be training harder not heavier than 90% of people in the gym.
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1 Post
Jan 19, 2015 5:26pm
via Android

Hey

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